Event Information
Taj Mahal Quartet
Date TBD
$45 - $65 Reserved Seating + Fees


6:00pm Doors

6:30pm Seating


Pre-Sale Timing:

 - All Presales ended Jan. 29 at 12pm CST


Friends of the Englert could order tickets early!

If you are interested in becoming a Friend of the Englert please click here or contact the box office.

 

Event Pricing
Zone 1 Reserved Seating - $65.00
Zone 2 Reserved Seating - $45.00

 
Ticket Selection
 
Ticket Availability
Ticketing Paused


Ticket Sales Are Currently Paused

We are navigating the challenges of the Covid-19 Pandemic and are currently not selling tickets to live events. We are talking with agents and touring staff almost daily to determine the best way forward for these events. Please let us know if you would like us to contact you once we are selling tickets again. If you have previously purchased tickets to paused live events, we can help answer any questions you may have. Email us at info@englert.org or give a call at 319-688-2653. Thank you!

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“When I began, soul was something people had. It wasn’t a style of music,” Taj Mahal says. No matter where we come from, we are all part of the same circle. We all want to dance, to get out of our heads, and tap into ourselves. When delivered by the Taj Mahal Quartet, the blues can take us there. For more than 40 years, Grammy-winning legend Taj Mahal, internationally renowned bassist Bill Rich, and revered percussionist Kester Smith have taken blues on a joyride through reggae, funk, jazz, cajun, and more, leaving a trail of swinging hips and raised palms in their wake. In 2019, guitarist and lap steel master Bobby Ingano joined the group, and the trio became the Taj Mahal Quartet. The four-match musical virtuosity with downhome grit unlike anyone else: a blend of sophistication and humble familiarity that is equally at home on a shotgun-shack porch or a Carnegie Hall stage. According to Taj, the collaboration extends far beyond the Taj Mahal Quartet themselves. “Music is like theater to a lot of people -- they’re watching it,” he says. “Well, you can watch it, but you’re supposed to participate. The audience is just as much a part of the music as the musicians are.” Taj pauses, then adds with a warm laugh, “I do like it when they dance.”