A Collection Of Indigenous Short Films From The Sundace Film Festival + Biidaaban (The Dawn Comes)

67 mins • NR

Showings

Lark Theater Mon, Oct 21 12:00 PM
Lark Theater Sun, Nov 3 10:00 AM
Lark Theater Wed, Nov 13 4:30 PM
Lark Theater Sat, Nov 16 2:50 PM
Lark Theater Sat, Nov 23 2:00 PM
Lark Theater Wed, Nov 27 2:15 PM
Lark Theater Thu, Nov 28 3:00 PM
Film Info
Event Type:Movie
Release Year:2019
Rating:NR
Genre:Shorts
Cast/Crew Info
Director:Various

Description

A COLLECTION OF
INDIGENOUS SHORTS
FROM THE
SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

+
BIIDAABAN
(THE DAWN COMES)


A new collaboration between Sundance Institute’s Indigenous Program and Art House Convergence (AHC), a North American coalition of community-based, mission-driven movie theaters. This collaboration brings together six Indigenous short films from Sundance Institute Fellows during November’s annual celebration of National Native American and Alaska Native Heritage Month.


“This endeavor fulfills an important goal of our program,
which is the diversity, creativity and immense talent
of emerging Indigenous filmmakers while
providing entertainment and expanding awareness
of Indigenous content for film audiences around the U.S.”
Sundance Institute’s Indigenous Program Director - N. Bird Runningwater


The six Indigenous Program-supported short films include:

Birds in the Earth, Marja Helander (Sámi)
Fainting Spells, Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga Band of Luiseño)
Jáaji Approx., Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga Band of Luiseño)
My Father's Tools, Heather Condo (Mi’gmaq)
Throat Singing in Kangirsuk, Eva Kaukai (Inuit) and Manon Chamberland (Inuit)
Shinaab, Part II, Lyle Mitchell Corbine Jr. (Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Indians).


In addition to these six Sundance currated shorts, the Lark will include in the program, Biidaaban (The Dawn Comes) by Michif Indigenous filmmaker Amanda Strong.

Synopsis:
Accompanied by a 10,000-year-old shapeshifter and friend known as Sabe, Biidaaban sets out on a mission to reclaim the ceremonial harvesting of sap from maple trees in an unwelcoming suburban neighborhood in Ontario. Driven by the words of Anishinaabe writer Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Amanda Strong’s mesmerizing stop-motion animation intricately weaves together multiple worlds through time and space, calling for a rebellion.