Black Gold: The Richfield Building, 1929-1969

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Description

We launch May preservation month a week early with a look at one of Los Angeles’ most mourned lost Art Deco treasures.


We have invited Nathan Marsak to return to the virtual stage to cast a spotlight on the black and gold Richfield Oil Company Building, located at 555 South Flower Street, from its construction in 1928/29 to its demolition in 1968/69. Also known as the Richfield Tower, the building headquartered Richfield Oil. The black and gold color scheme symbolized the "black gold" the company profited from.


How could something so utterly fantastic have survived only 40 years you ask? How could you who were born after 1969 have been robbed of the opportunity to experience the wonder of this Stiles O. Clements architected showpiece of downtown Los Angeles? In this illustrated presentation, Nathan will answer those questions and more in a talk on the fabled building that still inspires preservationists today. 


About the Author: Nathan Marsak is a Los Angeles based historian. His most recent book is Bunker Hill Los Angeles: Essence of Sunshine and Noir (Angel City Press).


PLEASE NOTE THAT THE TIME OF THIS LECTURE HAS BEEN CHANGED, SO THAT IT DOES NOT COINCIDE WITH THE ACADEMY AWARDS BROADCAST THIS EVENING. AN EBLAST STATING THAT IT WAS LATER IN THE DAY SHOULD BE IGNORED.


Tickets:

$10 ADSLA Members

$14 Non-Members


April 2021 has been declared “World Art Deco Month” by Art Deco International. The organization (of which ADSLA is a member), will host a diverse menu of online events and, where practical, in-person events - all designed to showcase the many aspects of the Art Deco style that includes architecture, design and entertainment.


Art Deco International has designated April 28 as “World Art Deco Day” in commemoration of the date in 1925, when the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts, opened its doors to the public in Paris. It was this event that inspired the term “Art Deco” to describe this new design movement.